Upload a Photo Upload a Video Add a News article Write a Blog Add a Comment
Blog Feed News Feed Video Feed All Feeds

Folders

Featured (474)
AK (0)
AZ (0)
CT (0)
DE (0)
DC (0)
FL (0)
GA (0)
HI (0)
KY (0)
ME (0)
MD (0)
MS (0)
NV (0)
NH (0)
NM (0)
NC (0)
ND (0)
OK (0)
RI (0)
SC (0)
SD (0)
TN (0)
VT (0)
VA (0)
WA (0)
WV (0)
WY (0)
All (11610)
 

News

 

Prohibition of Jewelry Lifted in High School Track and Field - NFHS

Published by
RunnerSpace.com/HighSchool   on Jul 14 2014, 08:38 PM

Prohibition of Jewelry Lifted in High School Track and Field

Effective with the 2015 high school track and field season, the prohibition of jewelry will be eliminated. This was one of several rules changes recommended by the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Track and Field Rules Committee at its June 16-18 meeting in Indianapolis. The committee’s recommendations were subsequently approved by the NFHS Board of Directors.

Becky Oakes, NFHS director of sports and liaison to the Track and Field Rules Committee, said the committee determined that prohibiting jewelry in high school track and field and cross country is not necessary.

“The wearing of jewelry ordinarily presents little risk of injury to either the competitor or opponents,” Oakes said. “Elimination of the rule allows officials to focus on meet administration directly related to actual competition. Coaches continue to have the obligation to see that competitors are properly equipped.”

In other changes, language regarding the time limit to initiate a trial in the throwing and jumping events was revised. Previously, competitors in these events had to initiate a trial and carry it to completion within one minute. Beginning next year, participants must only initiate the trial within the one-minute time limit. Completion of the event will be allowed beyond the prescribed time.

Another change was made in field events involving implements. In events such as the shot put, discus, javelin and pole vault, an additional trial will be allowed when an implement breaks – and thus becomes illegal – during competition due to no fault of the competitor.

The revised note in Rules 6-2-17 and 7-2-17 reads as follows: “If a legal implement breaks during an attempt in accordance with the rules, no penalty shall be counted against the competitor and a replacement trial shall be awarded. If the implement breaks upon completion of the trial, a replacement attempt shall not be awarded and the results of the trial shall be recorded, provided it was made in accordance with the rules.”

In the discus throw, it no longer will be a foul if a competitor is out of control when exiting the back half of the circle. Also, in the discus, shot put and javelin, the requirement for the judge to call “mark” was eliminated.

Another change involves the high jump and pole vault events. A new article in Rule 7-2 will state that “a crossbar displaced by a force disassociated with the competitor after he/she is legally and clearly over the crossbar shall not be a fault and is considered a successful attempt.”

In Rule 8 involving special events, the committee approved the 1,500-meter run as an alternate for the 1,600-meter run in the decathlon and pentathlon. Oakes said when using the IAAF standard scoring, the 1,500-meter run is the standard distance. In addition, the indoor weight throw was approved for the listing of special events.

The final change involves Rule 1-4 on indoor track. Since many indoor meets are held in college facilities, the committee approved the 60-meter high hurdles and dash as alternates for the 55-meter high hurdles and dash. Oakes said this option eliminates special marking of the facilities for the hurdles and dash.

Track and field is the second-most popular sport for boys with 580,672 participants in 16,001 schools and is the No. 1 sport for girls with 472,939 participants in 15,962 schools during the 2012-13 season, according to the NFHS Athletics Participation Survey.
Read the full article at: www.nfhs.org
Post to:  
Post as: 
13 comment(s)  
Joe Lanzalotto

DontStopPre, on , said:

I assume you're referring to not using video to coach during a meet and also the rule stating coaches can't use walkie talkies or cell phones or the like to communicate with each other during a meet. I never understand why a PV coach texting a sprint coach about what pizzaria to take the team after the meet violates rules lol.


The rule prohibiting the use of video during a meet was repealed last year. It is permitted anywhere on the meet site but may not be used to review an official's decision or to communicate with an athlete during a race or trial (no watching videos while you are running, guys).
DontStopPre

dkap, on , said:


I wonder if this came about because of the near-ubiquitousness of GPS watches and the blurred distinction between equipment and assistance? If that becomes harder to define, then so does the difference between watches and jewelry.

Dan


I assume you're referring to not using video to coach during a meet and also the rule stating coaches can't use walkie talkies or cell phones or the like to communicate with each other during a meet. I never understand why a PV coach texting a sprint coach about what pizzaria to take the team after the meet violates rules lol.
DontStopPre

Joe Lanzalotto, on , said:

Watches were already legal before this change except in NJ (and if there were other states that prohibited them).

Changing the discus rule to no longer require the thrower to be in control is indeed strange. If the discus why not the shot and the hammer?


Agree. Will we now start to see out of control discus newbies flailing themselves out of the back of the ring thinking that it will help? And why not the same rule for shot putters who spin?

I do believe that some gangly jav thrower or high jumper will eventually get his jav stuck in his necklace or bracelet or wrap his bracelet around a HJ standard but that's between him and his coach ... officials are now finally free from being fashion police and can officiate like they should.
dkap

Joe Lanzalotto, on , said:

Watches were already legal before this change except in NJ (and if there were other states that prohibited them).


That's what I was saying. ;)

Watches were okay in most states, but outside electronic assistance (or whatever the wording) was generally a no-no. With GPS, watches now fit that bill. It has become much tougher to define what is competition equipment. Admittedly, it's a weak connection between that aspect of watches and jewelry.

Dan
Joe Lanzalotto
Watches were already legal before this change except in NJ (and if there were other states that prohibited them).

Changing the discus rule to no longer require the thrower to be in control is indeed strange. If the discus why not the shot and the hammer?
dkap
Gotta love a rule change that absolutely no one will object to. Well, maybe some coaches of overly expressive athletes.

I wonder if this came about because of the near-ubiquitousness of GPS watches and the blurred distinction between equipment and assistance? If that becomes harder to define, then so does the difference between watches and jewelry.

Dan
DontStopPre

Joe Lanzalotto, on , said:

In theory but each state association can do what they want. For years watches were okay according to the NFHS rulebook but not in New Jersey where the state association regarded them as jewelry.


In Washington state we've never considered watches jewelry (thank god, even though I'm not personally for wearing a watch when racing, but it shouldn't be illegal). I was just curious if xc athletes could start racing in earing, necklaces, Livestrong bracelets, etc in 2014 or 2015.
Mike B
Im curious as to what was the impetus behind changing the rule governing exiting the rear of the discus ring. Seems a strange one.
Joe Lanzalotto

DontStopPre, on , said:

So xc athletes can wear jewelry in 2014 or 2015?


In theory but each state association can do what they want. For years watches were okay according to the NFHS rulebook but not in New Jersey where the state association regarded them as jewelry.
Coach Anthony
Finally! Now if we can just get the NFHS to go ahead and adopt the entire USATF rule book, we can streamline the rules across America :-)
DontStopPre
So xc athletes can wear jewelry in 2014 or 2015?
Joe Lanzalotto
Up to the individual state associations to adopt or not. I think most will; its a pain to administer and there is no practical reason for it.
Scott Joerger
NFHS Lifts Bank on Jewelry effective 2015.
History for RunnerSpace.com/HighSchool
YearVideosNewsPhotosBlogs
2014 3617 11610 6074 10
2013 5923 11107 9910 7
2012 3653 6559 12968 1
2011 1240 1320 2430 8
2010 1753 1131 1462 3
2009 575 684 1683 36
2008 65 151 101 51
2007 1 17    
2006   12    
2005   8    
2004   9    
2003 32 8    
2002   8    
2001 209 9    
2000 533 13    
1999   2    
1994 1      
1991 1      
1984 1      
1983 1      
1982 1      
1972 1      
1971 1      
1970 1      
1969 1      
1965 1      
1962 1      
1954 1      
Hashtags: #nghs #jewelrey